From: George W Frost on

"CrazyCam" <CrazyCam(a)optusnet.com.au> wrote in message
news:gh9ehl$nb4$1(a)aioe.org...
> Doctor Shifty wrote:
>> I'm riding a lot in the city with this new bike. Mostly turns off the
>> blinkers by auto-pilot, but not always. And having them running is a
>> nuisance to following traffic. So I thought of a simple solution. Trouble
>> is, perhaps there's something I haven't thought of.
>>
>> The push-in blinker canceller is just another wire being connected in the
>> switch block. So another wire in parallel will do the trick. But where to
>> control this cancelling wire?
>
> Are you absolutely sure of this?
>
> On the Triumph, my most modern bike, and the only one with a single turn
> signal button thing which you push to cancel, it feels like it's actually
> mechanically doing something.
>
> regards,
> CrazyCam

Certainly feels mechanical when it clicks off


From: Rheilly Phoull on

"Doctor Shifty" <dr.shifty(a)tpg.com.oz> wrote in message
news:gh8ibj$g5s$1(a)news.motzarella.org...
> I'm riding a lot in the city with this new bike. Mostly turns off the
> blinkers by auto-pilot, but not always. And having them running is a
> nuisance to following traffic. So I thought of a simple solution. Trouble
> is, perhaps there's something I haven't thought of.
>
> The push-in blinker canceller is just another wire being connected in the
> switch block. So another wire in parallel will do the trick. But where to
> control this cancelling wire?
>
> My idea is to have a micro-switch operate on a gear up-shift. This will
> turn the blinkers off as I change up out of the corner, but will allow
> them to stay on as I change down approaching a corner.
>
> It sounds as simple as possible. Can anyone see any circumstance where
> this won't work that I might have missed?
>
> Thanks
> Kim

Perhaps fitting a prominent indicator LED somewhere in your direct line of
site might be an alternative ?

Rheilly P


From: Smeeegles on
Doctor Shifty wrote:
> I'm riding a lot in the city with this new bike. Mostly turns off the
> blinkers by auto-pilot, but not always. And having them running is a
> nuisance to following traffic. So I thought of a simple solution.
> Trouble is, perhaps there's something I haven't thought of.
>
> The push-in blinker canceller is just another wire being connected in
> the switch block. So another wire in parallel will do the trick. But
> where to control this cancelling wire?
>
> My idea is to have a micro-switch operate on a gear up-shift. This will
> turn the blinkers off as I change up out of the corner, but will allow
> them to stay on as I change down approaching a corner.
>
> It sounds as simple as possible. Can anyone see any circumstance where
> this won't work that I might have missed?
>
> Thanks
> Kim


BMW has them
From: Kevin Gleeson on
On Fri, 05 Dec 2008 13:27:24 GMT, "Knobdoodle"
<knobdoodle(a)hotmail.com> wrote:

>
>"jl" <not-here(a)nowhere.com> wrote:
>> My 1984 Kwaka VN750 had self cancelling blinkers - they obviously weren't
>> a selling point if your 2008 Kwaka doesn't have them...
>>
>> JL
>> turned off when you turned the bars btw
>>
>Am I missing the joke or are you REALLY saying that a motorcycle's
>self-cancelling indicators work on handlebar movement?!!?

I was trying to remember. My RZ250 in the early 80s had
self-cancelling I think. I'm sure I've ridden something with them. And
my unreliable memory tells me that they were actually cancelled a
certain distance after a small handlebar movement. At low speed you
will do a small amount of direct steer. I'm happy to be proved wrong
and there was some other system doing it, but that long ago it had to
be mechanical. But it worked fine. That bit I DO remember.
From: Yeebok on
Peter wrote:
>
> "Zebee Johnstone" <zebeej(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:slrngjghif.6qb.zebeej(a)gmail.com...
>> In aus.motorcycles on Fri, 05 Dec 2008 07:28:35 +1100
>> CrazyCam <CrazyCam(a)optusnet.com.au> wrote:
>>> On the Triumph, my most modern bike, and the only one with a single turn
>>> signal button thing which you push to cancel, it feels like it's
>>> actually mechanically doing something.
>>
>> The one on the Guzzi is definitely mechanical, because you can cancel
>> the blinkers with the ignition off.
>>
>> Zebee
>
> Twas a ball bearing in the GPX250 as it was faulty and easier to crack
> open and repair than remove and replace...........
> Even for me!
>
> :-P
>
I presume most switch boxes are the same - that's the bit I had to
rewire and solder after my prang. The Hyo has a press switch for high
beam ('pass') and also the standard kill-switch-like-rocker thingo on
top. I'm ignoring them for this.

The indicator assembly itself just had 2 toggle switches (each flick
toggles it, rather than hold to keep on) and a post in the middle sat
over a ball bearing.

Switch => and <=
ballbearing : o
post : | and /\
|
=> o <=
/ \
Thumb

Pushing the thumb bit left/right pops the switch.
Pushing it in (up) uses the angled part to re-press and release the
switch turning them off. The curve of the ball bearing pulls the post
back towards you.

Fiddly little bastards to work on too. Certainly not a hobby I'd like to
take up..