From: CrazyCam on
Today, in Hornsby, I saw a bloke riding along on a unicycle.

I have to admit to being very impressed.

Anyhow, I noticed he didn't have a helmet on, but, when I thought about
it, I expect that it is perfectly legal.

regards,
CrazyCam
From: John Tserkezis on
CrazyCam wrote:

> Today, in Hornsby, I saw a bloke riding along on a unicycle.
> I have to admit to being very impressed.
> Anyhow, I noticed he didn't have a helmet on, but, when I thought about
> it, I expect that it is perfectly legal.

In NSW, a unicycle is bundled in the same class as 'bicycles', and thus
observe the same rights and restrictions as bicycles.

A helmet is legally required, but it's one of those very rarely if at all
enforced things.
--
Linux Registered User # 302622
<http://counter.li.org>
From: CrazyCam on
John Tserkezis wrote:
> CrazyCam wrote:
>
>> Today, in Hornsby, I saw a bloke riding along on a unicycle.
>> I have to admit to being very impressed.
>> Anyhow, I noticed he didn't have a helmet on, but, when I thought
>> about it, I expect that it is perfectly legal.
>
> In NSW, a unicycle is bundled in the same class as 'bicycles', and thus
> observe the same rights and restrictions as bicycles.
>
> A helmet is legally required, but it's one of those very rarely if at
> all enforced things.


It may well be bundled in with bikes in the minds of the cops, but I'd
bet thruppence that the folk writing the rules didn't even think of
unicycles, and, consequently, it isn't.

The folk that write rules ain't exactly smart, otherwise they'd have
real jobs. ;-)

regards,
CrazyCam
From: John Tserkezis on
CrazyCam wrote:

> It may well be bundled in with bikes in the minds of the cops, but I'd
> bet thruppence that the folk writing the rules didn't even think of
> unicycles, and, consequently, it isn't.

Ah, but it is.
In the Australian Road Rules, in part, under "dictionary" (where the
definitions are) Page 393:
<http://www.rta.nsw.gov.au/rulesregulations/downloads/pts1-21.pdf>

<quote>
"bicycle" means a vehicle with 1 or more wheels that is built to be propelled
by human power through a belt, chain or gears (whether or not it has an
auxiliary motor), and:

(a) includes a pedicab, penny-farthing, scooter, tricycle and unicycle; but

(b) does not include a wheelchair, wheeled recreational device, wheeled toy,
or any vehicle with an auxiliary motor capable of generating a power output
over 200 watts (whether or not the motor is operating).
</quote>

> The folk that write rules ain't exactly smart, otherwise they'd have
> real jobs. ;-)

Well, yes, but that's an entirely different story. :-)
--
Linux Registered User # 302622
<http://counter.li.org>
From: Nev.. on
John Tserkezis wrote:
> CrazyCam wrote:
>
>> It may well be bundled in with bikes in the minds of the cops, but I'd
>> bet thruppence that the folk writing the rules didn't even think of
>> unicycles, and, consequently, it isn't.
>
> Ah, but it is.
> In the Australian Road Rules, in part, under "dictionary" (where the
> definitions are) Page 393:
> <http://www.rta.nsw.gov.au/rulesregulations/downloads/pts1-21.pdf>
>
> <quote>
> "bicycle" means a vehicle with 1 or more wheels that is built to be
> propelled by human power through a belt, chain or gears (whether or not
> it has an auxiliary motor), and:
>
> (a) includes a pedicab, penny-farthing, scooter, tricycle and unicycle;
> but

So a rocket powered bicycle with no pedals is not a bicycle, but with
pedals it is. I think this _is_ a bicycle
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9V6VpoED4A

Nev..
'07 XB12X